Keiga

A look behind the scenes of the Keiga folding screen

This blog documents the restoration of “View of Deshima in Nagasaki Bay" by Kawahara Keiga

Curator East Asia Daan Kok and Research Associate RCMC/Japan Davey Verhoeven regularly share their updates of the restoration process and ongoing research. 

Blogpost 006 - The Chinese compound, Tôjin yashiki

Door de prominente weergave van Deshima en de Nederlandse vlaggen op het kamerscherm, lijken we vaak te vergeten dat er ook Chinese handelaren aanwezig waren in Nagasaki.

Lees: Blogpost 006 - De Chinese compound (Tôjin yashiki)

The Chinese compound

The Chinese compound, Tôjin yashiki

Due to the prominent depiction of Deshima and the Dutch fla

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Blogpost 005 - Deshima, the Dutch trading post in Nagasaki

An important location that is depicted on Keiga’s folding screen is Deshima: the artificial, fan-shaped island and location of the Dutch trading post.

Read more: Blogpost 005 - Deshima, the Dutch trading post in Nagasaki

Deshima op Keiga scherm
An important location that is depicted on Keiga’s folding screen is Deshima: the artificial, fan-shaped island and location of the Dutch trading post.
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Blog post 004: The unique position of Nagasaki as international port city

Looking at the Keiga folding screen, it soon becomes clear that Nagasaki is a proper port city. 

Read more: Blog post 004: The unique position of Nagasaki as international port city

Blog 004, Kawahara Keiga

Nagasaki as international port city

Looking at the Keiga folding screen, it soon becomes clear

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Blog post 003: Restoration and research - the first results 

The research part of the restoration of the folding screen by Keiga has finally started and the first results of the research are in.

Read more: Blog post 003: Restoration and research - the first results

Japans kamerscherm - Museum Volkenkunde
The restoration of the folding screen by Keiga has finally started and the first results of the research are in.
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Blog post 002: Kawahara Keiga: Documenting Japan’s nature and culture

For a better understanding of the folding screen’s origins, it helps to know a bit about its painter, Kawahara Keiga (1786-c.1860).

Read more: Blog post 002: Kawahara Keiga: Documenting Japan’s nature and culture
 

Huis in aanbouw, Kawahara Keiga,1823-1829
Kawahara Keiga - documenting Japan’s nature and culture
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Blog post 001: Keiga folding screen - behind the scenes

Welcome to this blog where we will be posting all the latest updates on the restoration of the folding screen by Kawahara Keiga over the coming months.

Read more: Blog post 001: Keiga folding screen - behind the scenes

Keiga
Uitzicht op Deshima in de baai van Nagasaki
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More information on the folding screen

This unique and previously unknown folding screen was acquired by the museum in 2018. Curators discovered the historically important screen in a private collection. There is no other folding screen known within the oeuvre of the Japanese artist Kawahara Keiga. It is a key piece that ties the entire existing Japan collection together.

The Dutch in Japan 
Since 1639, the Dutch were the only Westerners who had permission to trade in Japan. They were required to stay on the tiny island of Deshima in Nagasaki bay. Over two centuries later, in 1854, Japan was opened to trade with other Western countries.

Photographer without a camera
Because of the great detail in his work, Keiga is also known as the ‘photographer without a camera’. He had the exceptional privilege of freely accessing Deshima, which enabled him to visually record the Japanese-Dutch relations. It also gave him the opportunity to learn European painting techniques such as linear perspective, which he masterfully applied in this screen.

Kamerscherm - Deshima, de Nederlandse handelspost

This acquisition was made possible with generous support from:

Vereniging Rembrandt, Mondriaan Fund, VSB Fund, the BankGiro Loterij, and the Association of Friends of the National Museum of Ethnology.
The restauration is funded by the TEFAF Museum Restoration Fund.